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  work list 

WORKS WITHOUT OPUS : INDEXED WORKS | UNINDEXED WORKS
   WORKS WITH OPUS : 01-05 | 06-10 | 11-15 | 16-20 | 21-25
                     26-30 | 31-35 | 36-40 | 41-45 | 46-50
                     51-55 | 56-60 | 61-65 | 66-70 | 71-74 

 

Mazurka op. 6, 1

for pianoforte in F sharp minor, Op. 6, 1 (Br. 60, KK. 26-46)
composed in 1830/late, published in 1832

Mazurka op. 6, 2

for pianoforte in C sharp minor, Op. 6, 2 (Br. 60, KK. 26-46)
composed in 1830/late, published in 1832

Mazurka op. 6, 3

for pianoforte in E Major, Op. 6, 3 (Br. 60, KK. 26-46)
composed in 1830/late, published in 1832

Mazurka op. 6, 4

for pianoforte in E flat minor, Op. 6, 4 (Br. 60, KK. 26-46)
composed in 1830/late, published in 1832

        four mazurkas dedicated to Pauline Plater

“I am not sending the mazurka […], because I have not copied them out yet, not for dancing.” - From a letter by F. Chopin to his family in Warsaw, Vienna 22 December 1830

“Your Nocturnes and Mazurkas were reissued in Leipzig, and were sold out here in a few days.” - From a letter by Mikolaj Chopin to F. Chopin, Warsaw 13 April 1833

Mazurka op. 7, 1

for pianoforte in B Flat Major, Op. 7, 1 (Br. 61, KK. 47-79)
composed in 1830-32, published in 1832

“Your Mazurka […] is enjoying enormous success here […] it was played at the Zamoyski ball throughout the entire evening […] they were greatly pleased to dance to it. What is your opinion of this profanity considering it is a Mazurka intended more for listening […] M dear, write and tell me whether you meant it for dancing […]” - From a letter by Ludwika Jedrzejemiczowa to Chopin in Paris, Warsaw 9 February 1835.

“[At the concert given in Glasgow on 27 September 1848 Chopin] was encored for his well-known Mazurka in Bb, which he repeated with quite different nuances from those of the first.” - Reminiscence of Jullus Seligmann, present at the Chopin concert, in: J.C. Hadden, Chopin, London 1903.

Mazurka op. 7, 2

for pianoforte in A minor, Op. 7, 2 (Br. 61, KK. 47-79)
composed in 1830-32, published in 1832

for the 1st version see Br. 45

“ I learnt about many general issues concerning piano playing by working together with Liszt on Mazurkas in Bb major and in A minor from Op. 7 by Chopin. […] He treated them very seriously, especially the at the first glance easy bass in maggiore in the Mazurka in A minor. What a lot of work he took upon himself for my sake. “Only an ass could think that this is easy, but you can tell a virtuoso in those ties. Play it this way to Chopin, and he will certainly notice and be pleased. Those foolish French editions spoil everything; the slurs in the bass must be placed thus. If you play to him in this fashion, he will give you a lesson.” - Wilheim von Lenz, Die grossen Pianoforte – Virtuosen unsere Zeit, Berlin 1872

Mazurka op. 7, 3

for pianoforte in F minor, Op. 7, 3 (Br. 61, KK. 47-79)
composed in 1830-32, published in 1832

Mazurka op. 7, 4

for pianoforte in A Flat Major, Op. 7, 4 (Br. 61, KK. 47-79)
composed in 1830-32, published in 1832

The first version for pianoforte in A Flat Major Op. 7, 4 was Br. 7 composed in 1824

Mazurka op. 7, 5

for pianoforte in C Major, Op. 7, 5 (Br. 61, KK. 47-79)
composed in 1830-32, published in 1832

        five mazurkas dedicated to Monsieur Paul Emile Johns de la Nouvelle Orléans

Trio op. 8

for pianoforte, violin & cello in G minor, Op. 8 (Br. 25, KK. 80-86)
composed in 1829/early, published in 1832

        dedicated to Monsieur le Prince Antoine Radziwill

Nocturne op. 9, 1

for pianoforte in B flat minor, Op. 9, 1 (Br. 54, KK. 87-108)
composed in 1830-31/spring, published in 1832

Nocturne op. 9, 2

for pianoforte in E Flat Major, Op. 9, 2 (Br. 54, KK. 87-108)
composed in 1830-31/spring, published in 1832

"You write that you expect I play the second nocturne quite well. So play it every day with great delight; what does it matter that I play every little note if I do so without the soul with which you created it." - From a letter written by Izabela Chopin to Chopin, Warsaw 1834

"Chopin wanted the accompaniment to be studied by itself first, using both hands in such a way that each quaver chord would sound like a chorus of guitars. Only when the accompaniment had been mastered with two hands in this way, producing a correct and perfect sound, piano and in strict tempo, at a perfectly even Allegretto without lapsing into triplets, could we entrust it to the left hand alone, leaving the tenor voice to enter the upper part. The second variation, bars 13-16, was to be played Andante, and the third, bars 21-24, as a pathos, ladden Adagio; the theme and the second variation had to sing in a full-bodied, expressive manner, but without exaggerated sentimentality." - Wilhelm von Lenz, Uebersichtliche Beurtheilung der Pianoforte - Compositionen von Chopin, Neue Berliner Musikzeitung, 18 Sep 1872

Nocturne op. 9, 3

for pianoforte in B Major, Op. 9, 3 (Br. 54, KK. 87-108)
composed in 1830-31/spring, published in 1832

        three nocturnes dedicated to Madame Camille Pleyel (Marie Pleyel)

Etude op. 10, 1

for pianoforte in C Major, Op. 10, 1 (Br. 59, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1830/late autumn, published in 1832

"When I played with him the Etude in C major, the first of those he dedicated to Liszt, he made me practice in the morning very slowly. You shall benefit from this etude. If you learn it according to my instruction, it will expand your hand and enable you to perform arpeggios like stroke of the bow. Unfortunately, instead of teaching, it frequently un-teaches everything. I am quite aware that it is a generally prevalent error, even in our day, that one can only play this Etude well when one possesses a very large hand. But this is not the case, only a supple hand is required." - From a diary of Chopin pupil, Friederike Muller-Streicher, quoted in Niecks Chopin the man and the musican, London 1902

Etude op. 10, 2

for pianoforte in A minor, Op. 10, 2 (Br. 59, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1830/late autumn, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 3

for pianoforte in E Major, Op. 10, 3 (Br. 74, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1832/8/25, published in 1832 

"With regard to the etude, Chopin said to Gutmann that he had never in his life written another such beautiful melody; and on one occassion when Gutmann was studying it, the master lifted his arms and his hands clasped and exclaimed: O, my fatherland." - Reported by Chopin's pupil, Adoft Gutmann, to F. Niecks, Niecks, vide supra

Etude op. 10, 4

for pianoforte in C sharp minor, Op. 10, 4 (Br. 75, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1832/8, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 5

for pianoforte in G Flat Major, Op. 10, 5 (Br. 57, KK. 109-163) composed in 1830/summer (?)

"Did Clara Wieck play my etude well? How could she have chosen precisely this etude, the least interesting for those who do not know what is intended for the black keys, instead of something better. It would have been better to remain silent." - From a letter by Chopin to Fontana in Paris, Marseilles 25 Apr 1839

Etude op. 10, 6

for pianoforte in E Flat minor, Op. 10, 6 (Br. 57, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1830/summer, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 7

for pianoforte in C Major, Op. 10, 7 (Br. 68, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1832/spring, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 8

for pianoforte in F Major, Op. 10, 8 (Br. 42, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1829/10 - 1829/11, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 9

for pianoforte in F minor, Op. 10, 9 (Br. 42, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1829/10 - 1829/11, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 10

for pianoforte in A Flat Major, Op. 10, 10 (Br. 42, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1829/10 - 1829/11, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 11

for pianoforte in E Flat Major, Op. 10, 11 (Br. 42, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1829/10 - 1829/11, published in 1832

Etude op. 10, 12

for pianoforte in C minor, Op. 10, 12 (Br. 67, KK. 109-163)
composed in 1831/9, published in 1832

        twelve etudes dedicated to his friend Franz Liszt

"I write unaware of what my pen is scribbling since at this very moment Liszt is playing my Etudes, transferring me beyond the range of sensible thoughts. I would like to steal from him the manner of performing my own compositions." - Fragment of a joint letter by Chopin, Liszt, and Franchomme to Ferdinand Hiller in Frankfurt, Paris 20 Jun 1833

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